Tag Archives: visual studio

How to overload static methods in C#

Let’s say I have an abstract generic class and a descendant:

public abstract class AuditObject<T&gt; : ActiveRecordBase<T&gt;;

(yes I’m using ActiveRecord) and

public class Employee : AuditObject<Employee&gt;

In both of them I define some static Methods, e.g.

public static DataTable GetLookupTable(String where, Int32 topRows)
{
  return doExtremelyCleverStuffToFetchData(where, topRows);
}

(in the Employee class you need public new static or else you get a compiler warning)

As the code is, when I call e.g.

DataTable myList = AuditObject<T&gt;.GetLookupTable("inactive = 0", 100);

…and T is Employee, the static method is not “overriden” i.e. the one that is executed is the method in AuditObject, not Employee .So in AuditObject I modified the static methods (in this example, GetLookupTable) like this :

public static DataTable GetLookupTable(String where, Int32 topRows)
{
  DataTable tbl = null;
  Boolean hasOverride = hasMethodOverride("GetLookupTable");
  if (hasOverride)
  {
    tbl = invokeStaticMethod<T&gt;("GetLookupTable", new Object[2] { where, topRows }) as DataTable;
  }
  else
  {
    tbl = doExtremelyCleverStuffToFetchData(where, topRows);
  }
  return tbl;
}

Here’s how I find out if the static method exists :

private static Boolean hasMethodOverride(String methodName)
{
  var methodQuery =
    from method in typeof(T).GetMethods(
    BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod)
    where method.Name == methodName
    select method;
  return methodQuery.Count() > 0;
}

And here’s how the “override” method is called :

public static Object invokeStaticMethod<T&gt;(String MethodName, Object[] Args)
{
return typeof(T).InvokeMember(MethodName,
  BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod,
  null, null, Args);
}

Voila ! When I call, say, DataTable myList = AuditObject<T>.GetLookupTable(“inactive = 0”, 100); and T is Employee, I get results from the static method defined in the Employee class.

How to make Visual Studio 2012 look (almost) the same as 2010

If you’re like me, you HATE HATE HATE the look of VS 2012. It’s not only ugly; it’s unergonomic.

So naturally, a number of people have worked to make VS 2012 look like 2010. VS 2010’s look, IMNSHO, was a lot clearer and developer-friendlier.

So here’s a list of steps that have been tested and work :

0. Close both VS 2012 and VS 2010

1. If you haven’t already, install VS 2012 Update 2 or later (here)

2. With Update 2 or later, a new theme called “Blue” is available alongside “Dark” (the default) and “Light”. Select this one (you can find it in Tools -> Options -> Environment -> General) and click OK.

VS2012_options

3. Download the “Visual Studio Icon Patcher” from MS CodePlex (here)

4. Unzip it in a new folder

5. Open Visual Studio Command Prompt (use “Run as an Administrator”). In the command prompt, enter the following commands :

cd whatever-folder-you-have-unzipped-the-file-in

VSIP.exe

You’re now in the VSIP prompt. Continue typing (obviously you have to hit enter after each line –but you knew that already) :

backup -v=2012

extract

inject

menus

x

Done ! The outcome looks like this :

VS2012_look2010

Important note : The commands in step #5 assume that you have both VS 2012 and 2010 installed on your machine. If you don’t, you need to a) “extract” from a machine with VS 2010 installed b) copy the folder created (it’s called Images, and it’s placed under the new folder in which you unzipped Visual Studio Icon Patcher) and c) “inject” it in the target machine (i.e. the dev PC with VS 2012).